#hxd2013scholars Response for HxD 2013

This post is in response to Mad*Pow‘s sponsored conference pass giveaway to this year’s Healthcare Experience Design Conference at the end of March. Those interested in participating were given a list of six questions and were asked to answer one and write an amazingly articulate two paragraph response. Below is the question I chose and my idea/response. Thanks Mad*Pow!

Question #3:
If you were given $1 million and one year to improve the health outcomes in your community, what would you do?

I’d create a traveling social good incubator & internship program.
Located just outside of our nations capitol, my community (Reston, Virginia) is both incredibly dense (56K people within 17.4 square miles) and culturally very diverse. It would be short sighted for me to sit at my desk by myself and decide what type of healthy programs or initiatives my community needs to succeed, so with that I would use a million dollars to begin a traveling incubator staffed by 5 recent graduates (either from local universities or originally from the area) and mentored by myself and 2 other advisers. I would solicit applications from students interested in a year-long internship to lead the charge. It’s important to keep the incubator as diverse as our community so it would be required that no two students have the same degree. Each student would have graduated with a four-year degree from one of the following: political science / medical science / design / software development / business & communications.  Advisers would have a minimum of 20 years of business experience in one of the aforementioned fields. Having both a mix of backgrounds and age groups will provide the incubator with a diverse strategy for thinking and solving problems. This will be our core team.

Our goal would be to use the first three months of the year to understand our community. We will literally drive through town (in our RV) to watch, listen and learn from our community. We will need to set up interviews across age groups and cultures to find out what’s existing and missing. By the end of the third month we will have determined the most pressing need and can define our program. We’ll use March and April to solicit local volunteers and schools to participate in the execution of our goal, with final program deliverables determined by the core team. While our interns are working I will develop a plan with our advisers to begin to establish partnerships with local businesses. Being a diverse and dense area also means that there are a lot of local businesses that could become potential partners (both for communication and fundraising strategies). From there we’ll use April through June to develop all aspects of the program, be it events to mobile applications. In July we’ll soft launch our initiative and work out any kinks, allowing us to officially launch in August. By September we should be able to calculate some results which we will use to raise revenue and more partners for the incubator’s second year. Ideally this isn’t a once and done traveling incubator. Hopefully it’s something that lives on and changes with the needs of our community for many many years to come.

Money breakdown (estimated):
Students would be paid $40K, advisers would offer their time gratis = ($200K)
RV costs + gas & maintenance = ($200K)
Supplies / Equipment (computers, etc) = ($50K)
The determined Initiative = ($400K)
Remaining for overages & reinvestment the following year = ($150K)

Sad UP. Confident Jawbone.

I was more excited for that Jawbone UP then I really should have been. Now, don’t get me wrong. I didn’t really think it was going to be the answer to a more active lifestyle, but I was excited to track my progress, patterns and use it to my fitness advantage.

A mere three days after my upbeat and optimistic blog post, my UP vibrated and died. No more tracking. No more patters. No more movement alerts. Seriously? Yep. I should have just gotten the FITBIT. Maybe I still will.

Then, after tweeting about my broken and sad-faced UP, a friend of mine sent me this link. Too ironic right? That never happens to me. The article states:

Jawbone has released an announcement that it will offer a no-questions-asked refund policy on the UP in order to win back customer confidence.

I submitted my information and yesterday I got my refund in the mail. Nope, they weren’t kidding.

I’m not sure if this has really changed my opinion of the UP. After all, I did buy it from the Apple store and I’m sure they would have taken it back.

Overall thoughts: The data it collected was interesting, but not ground breaking. Again, the sleep data was by far the most interesting but not necessary. It didn’t help me sleep better, in fact I probably slept worse knowing it was tracking me ALL NIGHT LONG. The feature that allows you to compete against other people was motivating. I was waiting for my sister to get one and the day she did mine stopped working. Hilarious.

Overall great idea — I’m anxious to see what they come out with as an adaption to the UP. Will I buy it? Maybe. I haven’t lost my confidence in Jawbone.

26 Days of UP by Jawbone

Yeah so Hi. It’s been a while since my last post on my favorite smoothies. I’ve started and stopped several posts until NOW.

Yesterday I purchased the UP by Jawbone and I am officially IN LOVE. UP is a new device created to track daily activities, specifically: eating, sleeping and movement to inspire healthier lifestyles. The device itself is a bracelet that you wear 24 hours a day. It collects data on steps, workouts and food intake during the day and sleep patterns at night. I really like the bracelet because it’s both stylish (IMO) and comfortable. I forget I’m wearing it!

So far the most interesting data collected is while I’m sleeping. It tracks how often I wake up and whether I’m getting light or deep sleep. IT’S CRAZY! The first night I slept horribly — probably because I was anxious to get the reading as soon as I woke. This is what the reading looked like on my first day:

The other really cool feature is that you can set it as an alarm clock – a silent alarm clock that vibrates to gently wake you. The technology is designed to intelligently wake you at the ideal moment in your natural sleep cycle just before your desired wake time. This might be the best feature.

The active data is interesting – not sure how accurate it is though. I wore it to the gym today where I did cardio for over an hour – a mix of running, step and latter work. It couldn’t accurately calculate my steps on a machine, but it did calculate my time on the treadmill.

Another very cool feature is the movement reminder. Set an interval of time (I set mine at an hour) and your UP wristband will vibrate on your wrist to remind you to move when you’ve been inactive for too long. This could also be my favorite feature.

The food log is, eh OK. It tracks food with images you take with your phone, which is a great reminder but it can’t accurately tabulate calories through those images (that would be cool!). I wouldn’t suggest getting the UP solely to track food intake since the data collected isn’t giving a reading of anything useful if you are trying to count calories.

I’m anxious to use UP steadily for the remainder of the month of December. I’ll report back in January with a more accurate review once I’ve used it daily for 26 more days.

“Wired” to the iPad

I wasn’t sure I really cared about the iPad. I mean, how much more technology do I really need (I totally feel like my grandma saying that).

Here’s the thing: technology is changing the way we engage with each other and with content. The iPad is going to enable magazines to thrive again, using multidimensional experiences to re-engage with their audience. This is so cool! Check out this video by Wired on their new iPad App: